Are a Floor Scrubber and a Floor Buffing Machine the Same?

Have you ever been looking at a floor machine and wondered just what exactly the thing did? Naturally, if you’re in the business of using one, you’re probably more familiar with this than others are, but to the uninitiated, most floor machines probably look like vaguely different iterations of the same thing.

That’s where you’ll get conflicting terms like “floor scrubber” and “floor buffer,” among other terms that may get thrown around. There are also floor cleaners that you can ride on, as well as floor cleaners termed as “high-speed” and “low-speed” as well. Without getting too lost in the fine details, we’re going to shed some light on the differences between floor scrubbers and floor buffing machines.

Strictly speaking, a machine that just scrubs and therefore cleans the floors in question should not be called a floor buffing machine; it’s more likely to be called a floor scrubber or a floor cleaning machine. These machines typically contain a measure of floor cleaning liquid along with rotating heads or scrubbing wheels or brushes. They release some liquid onto the floor, the scrubbing heads or brushes, which spin, dislodge dirt, and clean the floor. Additionally, floor cleaning machines remove the excess liquid from the floor, leaving it freshly cleaned. These machines can be ridden but there are also variants that are intended to be pushed.

These contrast with floor buffing machines which are used for a few similar purposes. Most floor buffers are used to remove the wax or finish from a floor before a new finish can be applied. Some buffers are used to buff the floor in order to restore its shine. Because of this, and in addition to the fact that buffers are usually not able to remove any liquid applied, the floor must be cleaned before a buffer can be used.

As opposed to floor scrubbers and other floor cleaners, floor buffers sit on top of a special buffing pad. Because they do not rest on wheels in the same manner as a floor scrubber or cleaning machine, they can be more carefully maneuvered, especially in a side-to-side fashion.

Another similar type of machine is a floor burnisher, which is used for burnishing, or as it may be more commonly known, for floor polishing. Burnishers, like cleaning machines, typically rest on wheels and therefore do not typically offer the same side-to-side cleaning path as some buffers. However, they operate at higher speeds, enabling them to polish or shine a floor with fewer passes. To achieve the same effect with a floor buffing machine would take more effort.

Are you interested in learning more about the different types of floor scrubbers, buffing machines or burnishers, and other cleaning equipment that are commonly used for cleaning and polishing commercial flooring surfaces? Maybe you’re simply interested in upgrading your current equipment to a newer model and you want to see what kind of variety there is in functionality. Either way, you can solve either of these problems with a quick visit to JaniSource.com.

Visit their website today and take advantage of their expansive collection of specialty cleaning products and equipment – and if you have any questions at all, just call them up at 877-MOPHEAD.

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